DIY Laundry Room Sign

Paint and vinyl are all it takes to make this cute DIY laundry room sign

The summer after my husband and I got married, we drove out to Buffalo, NY, where he sold security systems.  Towards the end of the summer, his office got moved to Philadelphia, PA.  Thankfully, there were many wives who were out with their husbands so we became good friends and did some sightseeing here and there.  While in Philadelphia, we decided to drive out to a little amish town and do some exploring.  In one of the little shops we visited, I found a laundry room sign.  This sign has been with us for almost 9 years and when I first bought it, I thought it was the cutest thing, but as I’ve grown into my own personal style of decorating, I found that it just wasn’t working anymore.  So I decided to do a little DIY laundry room sign makeover and share this easy tutorial with you!

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So this is what the sign looked like before I painted it.  A little sad, a little dated, but still in great shape.

Paint and vinyl are all it takes to make this cute DIY laundry room sign

Supplies needed:

First, prep your surface.  Since my board was already cut down to size, all I needed to do was wipe it off to remove dust and dirt.  There was probably a really thin coat of finish on top, but not enough for me to worry about sanding it before painting.  I also removed the wire that was originally holding the board up on the hook.

Next, paint your surface.  I did two coats of paint (in charcoal) to make sure I covered the original color and letters really well and then let it dry completely.

Paint and vinyl are all it takes to make this cute DIY laundry room sign

While the board is drying, I created my design.  I use my Silhouette Design Studio for my Silhouette Cameo to do this and it made everything SO easy.  I changed the size of my design page to the size of my board (16×6) so I could get a really accurate representation of how everything would fit.  I used the font Magnolia Sky for ‘Laundry Room’ and Bebas for ‘wash dry fold repeat’.  Both fonts are free.  Get Magnolia Sky HERE and Bebas HERE.  (Also, check out my tutorial for installing fonts HERE.)  

Once I had everything the size I wanted, I opened a New Drawing (blank page) and changed the design page back to 12×12 since that is the size of my cutting mat.  I copied the text and pasted it, then put it on the page to minimize the amount of vinyl I’d need to use to cut everything I needed.  Then I sent it to cut.

I removed the vinyl from the machine and then used my weeding tool to pull out the smaller pieces of vinyl.  Then I pulled off the remaining vinyl around the letters, so that when I was done, all I was left with was the words on my backing.

Paint and vinyl are all it takes to make this cute DIY laundry room sign

Next, I arranged the words on my board so they were close to where I ultimately wanted them.  (You could skip this part if you’re really confident about where everything is going, but I always like to do this first so I can visualize the final product easier.)

Paint and vinyl are all it takes to make this cute DIY laundry room sign

Then I peeled the backing off of the transfer paper and laid the sticky, clear part on top of the words.  After doing all the words, I used this little vinyl application tool I got a long time ago that has a hard plastic edge to it to rub the vinyl underneath the transfer paper and smooth out bubbles.  I’ve seen people use credit cards for this too.  (This helps it adhere to the transfer paper so when you pull the backing off the vinyl, it sticks to the transfer paper more easily.)

Paint and vinyl are all it takes to make this cute DIY laundry room sign

Paint and vinyl are all it takes to make this cute DIY laundry room sign

Now, I slowly pulled the backing off of my vinyl.  Try to pull in the direction of the curve so you don’t risk stretching or ripping the vinyl.

Next, very carefully place the words on the board.  You don’t want to press down just yet because if you need to move the words you want it to come up easily.  When everything was where I wanted it, I pressed down on the vinyl to keep it in place, then used my hard plastic edged tool to rub on top of all the letters.  Then, I removed the transfer paper slowly in case any part of the word was still sticking to it.

*Tip: You can reuse transfer paper.  Just put the backing from the transfer paper back onto the clear transfer paper and store it away until next time.  This is a huge money saver!

(If you used the color of vinyl you wanted, then you are done and can admire your work!  But if you want to paint over the top of your words like I did, keep following along.)

After pulling the transfer tape off, I inspected the edges of the vinyl to make sure there weren’t any bubbles or anything preventing it from adhering to the surface.  You want a really good seal.  Once this was done, I grabbed my white paint and did two coats. 

Paint and vinyl are all it takes to make this cute DIY laundry room sign

Paint and vinyl are all it takes to make this cute DIY laundry room sign

I let it dry for about 5 minutes, then grabbed my weeding tool and carefully used it to snag the beginning of the word.  Once I had a piece big enough to hold onto, I used my fingers to pull the vinyl off, going slowly and trying to pull in the direction of the curve. 

Paint and vinyl are all it takes to make this cute DIY laundry room sign

If you happen to wait a little too long before pulling the letters off, you might end up with some edges that aren’t totally smooth (which is what happened to me).  For me, I didn’t worry about this because I knew I wanted to sand the sign and distress it a little and once I did that, you couldn’t tell.

Allow the paint to finish drying completely.  You can either end here and hang up your amazing sign, or you can use some sandpaper and distress the edges and top a bit to let the bottom paint color come through.

Paint and vinyl are all it takes to make this cute DIY laundry room sign

Paint and vinyl are all it takes to make this cute DIY laundry room sign

And that’s it!  I hope this tutorial gave you a little bit of inspiration to add something cute to your laundry room.

Happy crafting!

Rainbow String Art Tutorial

Simple rainbow string art tutorial that can be used to make any shape you want!

When it comes to crafting, I like to try everything.  I have an entire craft room full of all sorts of supplies for everything from vinyl, embroidery, scrapbooking, acrylic paints, a million brads, felt, adhesives…phew!  And that’s not even close to everything.  Something I’ve been wanting to try my hand at is string art.  I’ve seen it all over and there are so many shops that sell it.  My friend Sarah over at Making Joy and Pretty Things recently did a cute string art heart for her daughter’s nursery.  I commented on her post and told her I’d been wanting to try it out myself and she suggested I do one for St. Patrick’s Day.  So I did.  *wink*

I went back and forth on what I wanted to do.  I did sketches, looked at images on Google and finally settled on a rainbow because there are really only so many images that go along with St. Patrick’s Day.

Here’s a list of the supplies you’ll need to make your own:

  • piece of wood, desired size
  • 1″ nails
  • hammer
  • embroidery floss, desired colors
  • outline of image (printed out)
  • vinyl for wording (optional)
  • acrylic paint (optional)
Simple rainbow string art tutorial that can be used to make any shape you want!

Simple rainbow string art tutorial that can be used to make any shape you want!

To start, I had my husband cut a piece of wood for me from a scrap piece we had lying around.  I used a 2×6 and cut it so it was 7″ tall x 9″ long.  (Seriously, why don’t they call it a 2×7?)  Sand down the edges for a cleaner look and wipe off all the dust.  I found an outline of a rainbow with clouds that I liked, saved the image, opened it in a word document and printed it out.  When selecting my rainbow image, I counted the number of arches so that I could have six colors (I left out indigo).

(Originally, I had planned on painting it my wood, but I got a little ahead of myself and started putting nails in.  Once I realized this, I was about half way done nailing and didn’t want to take it all out and start over.  So if you’re going to paint it, definitely make sure you do it before you get too far.)

Next, I cut the paper so it would be the same size as my piece of wood.  Then I grabbed a couple of nails and hammered them in on opposite sides to keep the paper from moving.

Simple rainbow string art tutorial that can be used to make any shape you want!

I started with the clouds.  I put a nail at each of the points and then filled it in from there, trying to space them as evenly as possible–probably about 1/4″.

From there I moved on to the curve of the rainbow, continuing to space the nails about 1/4″ apart.

Simple rainbow string art tutorial that can be used to make any shape you want!

Now you grab your first color of embroidery floss and tie it on to the nail that will be your starting point.  I started with the red for the first arch of the rainbow because I wanted the white of the clouds to cover all of the ends of each color.  I wrapped the floss all the way around each nail at the top of the arch so I had a straight line, then I started randomly looping the floss between the first and second row of nails until I got back to the beginning.  I tied it off by tying it to the tail of the string I started with.  I continued this until I got all the way through each of the colors of the rainbow.

Simple rainbow string art tutorial that can be used to make any shape you want!

Simple rainbow string art tutorial that can be used to make any shape you want!

Simple rainbow string art tutorial that can be used to make any shape you want!

When I got to the clouds, I tied the string to a nail, wrapped it all the way around each nail so I had an outline and then started randomly looping the floss until it had the same type of coverage that the arches had.

Since I was left with space at the top of the rainbow, I decided to add some vinyl that said “Over the”.  I designed the words in my Silhouette Studio software and cut them using black adhesive vinyl on my Silhouette Cameo.

Simple rainbow string art tutorial that can be used to make any shape you want!

And that’s it!  This project cost me nothing since I already had everything I needed at home, but even then, it is a fairly inexpensive project since embroidery floss and a package of nails are a dollar or less for each.

Simple rainbow string art tutorial that can be used to make any shape you want!

Have you tried string art before?  What image would you want to create?

DIY Hanging Necklace Holder

Make your own hanging necklace holder using a piece of scrap wood and some cute drawer knobs!

When my husband and I first moved into our house almost 6 years ago, we had our first shared closet since we’d been married 3 years before.  Up until that point, we’d always lived in apartments and all of them had small closets.  Or maybe they just seemed small to me considering all of my clothes fit into one closet with no room leftover for my husband…  My poor hubby always had to use the closet in the second bedroom for his clothes in each of the places we lived.  So when we moved into our home, we had a bigger closet, which was great.  But there wasn’t any room for me to put my jewelry.  I don’t like keeping it out on my dresser and prefer to have it out of reach of little hands.  So what to do?

To utilize the wall space in our closet, I made a quick necklace holder using a piece of scrap wood, some fabric, nails, hooks and a sawtooth hanger to hang it on the wall.  It’s been totally functional and a great way to organize my necklaces but over the last few months, I decided I wanted to change it more to fit my current style.  You can see what my original necklace hanger looks like below.  Not bad right?  But not great.

Make your own hanging necklace holder using a piece of scrap wood and some cute drawer knobs!

So off I went to Hobby Lobby to find some cute drawer knobs.  I watched for them to go on sale (yay for 50% off!) and found 6 that I thought went together without being too matchy-matchy.  If you’ve ever looked at the knobs and pulls they have at Hobby Lobby, you know that they have an awesome variety, but in my case, this actually made it so much harder for me to choose.  Besides choosing coordinating knobs, they also had to have a big enough space between the end of the knob and the screw in part to hold the necklaces.  I’m not kidding when I say that I spent a solid 45 minutes looking at knobs.  My kids were going crazy of course: “Don’t touch that!  Put that back!  No, don’t put it in your mouth.  Please, get off the ground!”  (Anyone else?)  Total I ended up spending $14 for the knobs.  I also bought a small bottle of white chalk paint since I wanted to distress it a bit.

Once home, I put the bag in my craft room and there it sat for a good 2 months until I was cleaning out my closet and found it again, still in the bag on the floor.  (Haha, this is the story of my life when it comes to crafts.)  I finally got around to making my new necklace holder and it only took me about an hour, including dry time!

Here’s what you’ll need to make your own:

Make your own hanging necklace holder using a piece of scrap wood and some cute drawer knobs!

  • a piece of scrap wood
  • sandpaper
  • chalk paint (or acrylic paint)
  • foam brush
  • petroleum jelly (for distressing)
  • knobs (I used 6)
  • power drill (optional)
  • 1/4″ drill bit (optional)
  • paper
  • pencil
  • sawtooth hanger
  • nails

To get started, measure the space where you want to put your necklace holder.

Cut your wood down to size or find a piece of scrap wood that happens to be lying around your house from previous projects.  Mine is 12″x5″  but yours may vary depending on how many knobs you want to use and how many necklaces you need it to hold.  Also, be aware that you’ll want to use a thicker piece of wood since the part of the knob that gets screwed in is about 1 1/2″ long.  If you use a thinner piece of wood you’ll run into a problem when you try to hang it on the wall since the end will be poking out the back.

Sand the cut edges so they are smoother.  How much you sand is completely up to you.  I just went until the edges were slightly rounded and when I ran my hand over it, I didn’t come away with any splinters.

The next step is optional, depending on if you want to distress your wood or not.  I did a tutorial a while back about how to distress wood using petroleum jelly.  It’s a technique I use all the time because it’s less messy than painting first and then sanding it down.  You can also do it in layers if you want multiple colors on your wood.  Find the full tutorial HERE.

Grab your petroleum jelly and rub a small amount in random places on your board, paying close attention to the grain of the wood, as this will help the distressing look more natural.  You can see where I added mine because it’s a little bit shiny.

Make your own hanging necklace holder using a piece of scrap wood and some cute drawer knobs!

Next, paint your board using a foam brush.  You can paint right over the top of the petroleum jelly.  I only painted the front, top, bottom and sides since no one will see the back.  Let it dry.

Once dry, use a paper towel and gently rub over the places where you put the petroleum jelly.  It will rub right off!  So much easier than using sandpaper and getting dust all over the place.  Again, see the full tutorial for more details.

Make your own hanging necklace holder using a piece of scrap wood and some cute drawer knobs!

Now it’s time to measure and mark the placement of the knobs.  I used 6 knobs and staggered them so each row is off center and the middle two knobs split the center.  First, I measured the exact center of the board.  Then I measured the length of the board and tried to figure out how much space I wanted between each knob.  This was actually a little trickier than I originally thought it would be so I got a piece of paper out, measured out the size of my wood and then used that to figure out the placement of each hole.  Then I cut it out, placed it over my wood as a template and taped it down before pre-drilling my holes.  So much easier than trying to make marks on my painted wood and I got it exactly straight!

Make your own hanging necklace holder using a piece of scrap wood and some cute drawer knobs!

I always try to “pre-drill” my holes to make it easier on myself.  You’ll find that drawer knobs are flat on the end and getting the hole started will save you time and you don’t have to use your muscles as much. *wink*  I used a hammer and nail to get the placement right, removed the template and then I grabbed my husband’s power drill and a 1/4″ bit and pre-drilled about 3/4 of the way down.

Make your own hanging necklace holder using a piece of scrap wood and some cute drawer knobs!

I had one knob where the end was just slightly longer than my wood was deep so I ended up drilling a hole all the way through.  It poked out the back a little so I got a small piece of felt and glued it to the back of the board to cover the end of the screw so it won’t scratch my wall.

Make your own hanging necklace holder using a piece of scrap wood and some cute drawer knobs!

Next, I decided what order I wanted my knobs to be in and then started screwing them in.  Each of my knobs came with a nut and washer on the end.  I didn’t need the nut but I kept the washer on.

Make your own hanging necklace holder using a piece of scrap wood and some cute drawer knobs!

Lastly, grab your sawtooth hanger, measure the center of the board (on the back) and down about 1/2″ and then nail it in.  Get another nail for the wall where you want to hang it up, hammer it in and then hang your new necklace holder.  Easy peasy!

Make your own hanging necklace holder using a piece of scrap wood and some cute drawer knobs!

I love my new necklace hanger!  It makes me so happy when I walk in and see it.  One thing (among many) that I love about this project is that it’s completely personalized.  Plus, it’s pretty enough that you could hang it up in your room if you want and it will look nice on the wall and won’t take up space on your dresser.  Win-win!

Make your own hanging necklace holder using a piece of scrap wood and some cute drawer knobs!

Make your own hanging necklace holder using a piece of scrap wood and some cute drawer knobs!

What do you use to store your different pieces of jewelry?

DIY Elf Door

Elf Door--Start a new tradition with your family this Christmas!

I’m always trying to think of new traditions for my family to incorporate during the holidays.  Right now, we just have a handful of Christmas traditions but I’ve been wanting to add another one.  In August I got an email from Jane.com with a cute little elf door.  What at fun idea! I thought to myself as I clicked on the link.  As cute as it was, I didn’t want to pay $24 for the door plus the other accessories (fence, lights, etc) and then pay for shipping.  I knew I could do it for cheaper myself and starting looking around online.

It turns out that Hobby Lobby’s miniature dollhouse collection was the perfect solution.  I’ve been watching for those items to go on sale and when they did, I went over and picked up what I needed.  Using my 40% off coupon, I was able to get the door for $6.59, plus the doorknob and key for $3.49 (30% off) and some mini Christmas light bulbs for $1.39 (30% off), which brought my total to $12.26 with tax.  I already have acrylic paint and brushes to paint the door and instead of using miniature fencing, I decided to cut some out of vinyl using my Silhouette Cameo, which I could then stick to the wall and remove at the end of the season.  So by doing this myself, I was able to save myself more than half of what it would have cost to buy it from Jane.com.

Elf Door--Start a new tradition with your family this Christmas!

*Note: I did look on Amazon for the supplies to make this, but it was less expensive to buy it at Hobby Lobby.  But definitely feel free to shop around a bit.  You might find a better deal or decide you want a different kind of door or doorknob set.  The great thing about this craft is that you can totally personalize it!

I’ve been thinking about what kind of activity I could do with my kids to incorporate this little elf door into our traditions.  Ultimately, I kept it simple and told my kids that there is a magical elf door that leads directly to the North Pole.  Elves can come through it and check to make sure the kids are being good and then report to Santa.  You could be more elaborate if you want and do Elf on the Shelf type things but I don’t want to stress myself out by committing to do that every night.

So here’s what you’ll need to make your own Elf Door:

  • miniature door
  • miniature doorknob
  • miniature fence (vinyl or wood)
  • miniature Christmas light bulbs
  • acrylic paint (in desired colors)
  • paint brushes
  • glue
  • thin jewelry wire (silver or gold)

First, I painted the door frame white and the door a bright red and let it dry.

Elf Door--Start a new tradition with your family this Christmas!

Then I glued the doorknob on using some Tacky Glue and let it dry.

Meanwhile, I opened up my Silhouette Studio software and grabbed a picket fence silhouette from Google.  I was able to get the silhouette by using the ‘Trace’ function, then I saved the image in my library to use later on.  To determine the size of the fence, I measured the height of the door (about 7.5″) and then used a ruler to visualize the height of the fence.  Then I resized it in the Silhouette Studio and cut it out on my white vinyl.

Elf Door--Start a new tradition with your family this Christmas!

To make the strand of lights, I removed the gold wires that were strung through the lights.  Then I cut a length of wire about 24″ long.  I strung the first light on and then twisted it at the top a couple times so it wouldn’t slide around.  I threaded the next light on and spaced it about 1″-1.5″ from the first light and repeated the twist at the top.  I continued around until I reached the end of the wire, leaving about 1″ at the end.

Elf Door--Start a new tradition with your family this Christmas!

Elf Door--Start a new tradition with your family this Christmas!

I decided to put the door in our kitchen/dining area because we spend a lot of time there.  I wanted it to be visible to the kids so they would remember that the “elf” is going to check on them.  I placed the door above the baseboards and stuck it to the wall using tape I had rolled up and put on the back, making it easily removable at the end of the season.  Then I put about 3″ of vinyl fence on either side of the door.  Finally, I strung the lights around the door, draping them across the top and bending the wire and securing the ends under the top part of the vinyl fence.

Elf Door--Start a new tradition with your family this Christmas!

Elf Door--Start a new tradition with your family this Christmas!

As I was setting it up, I explained to my daughter about the elf and the magic door.  I tried to keep it simple so I could remember what I told her.  If I make a mistake, I’m sure she’ll correct me. *wink*  When my son woke up from his nap, he noticed it and went right over to investigate.  He’s not quite old enough to understand “elves” and “magic” but he thought it was fun anyway.  Hopefully he won’t mess with it too much.  If you have younger kids, you can always move the door up higher above a table or counter so it’s out of reach of little hands.

Elf Door--Start a new tradition with your family this Christmas!

Elf Door--Start a new tradition with your family this Christmas!

I had so much fun putting this little elf door together!  I hope this will be a fun tradition we can enjoy for years to come.

What are some of your favorite Christmas traditions?

Hallway Table Makeover

Use chalk paint for a quick furniture makeover without the prep work of sanding!

Before I had my daughter, I worked for a digital scrapbooking company in their home office.  Below the main office, there was a warehouse that was rented out by a furniture store to hold their stock.  Occasionally they would have a sale on pieces that were slightly damaged or missing parts and they would invite us to come and take a look.  It was during one of these sales that I found a cute little wood table for about $20.  It had a couple of tiny scratches on the top but was otherwise in perfect condition.  So I bought it and brought it home to my husband who looked at me like I’d bought the ugliest thing in the world.

We had recently moved into our current home and I thought the table would look nice in the hallway due to how narrow it was.  And it fit perfectly!  The only problem with it was the color, which was a medium-dark brown with a slight reddish tint to it.  I had grand plans to paint it but it just sat there in the hallway, boring brown and mismatched with all our other furniture.

Use chalk paint for a quick furniture makeover without the prep work of sanding!

Use chalk paint for a quick furniture makeover without the prep work of sanding!

Fast forward five years.  I was looking at this little table one day and I got the itch to paint it.  Like, that day.  So after getting myself and the kids ready for the day, I loaded up and drove to Walmart to to buy some chalk paint.  I knew I wanted to use chalk paint because I didn’t want to have to worry about prepping the wood for painting.  When I got to Walmart, I found the brand I was looking for, but the color I wanted was completely gone.  As in, all three sizes were cleared out.  Someone else must have beat me to the punch.  So, I got back in the car and drove to another Walmart (I live within 5 minutes of two stores) and thankfully found two bottles of the color I was looking for.  Phew!  (I used Waverly Inspirations Chalk Paint in the color Agave.)

Use chalk paint for a quick furniture makeover without the prep work of sanding!

When my son went down for his nap, I took the table apart in my front room and put all the screws in a bag so they wouldn’t get lost.  Then I laid out some painter’s plastic in the garage and started painting.  I just used a regular stiff bristle brush and tried to make the strokes as even as possible.  Everything dried fairly quickly so by the time I was done with the first coat, I was able to start on the second coat.  Once it was dry, I brought it inside and put it back together.

Use chalk paint for a quick furniture makeover without the prep work of sanding!

The next day during my son’s naptime, I took the table outside and used some sand paper to distress it a little bit on some of the corners and edges.  Nothing too extreme but just enough so that if someone looked closely at it, they would know it wasn’t just a scratch on an otherwise smooth table.

Use chalk paint for a quick furniture makeover without the prep work of sanding!

Use chalk paint for a quick furniture makeover without the prep work of sanding!

And that’s it!  I put the table back in the hallway and pulled out a white vase and some pink flowers and placed them on top.  I love how simply changing the color of the table added so much brightness to the hallway.  I did the same thing with an old cabinet door that I turned into a sign and placed above our kitchen cabinets.  New paint makes such a huge difference!  (See the cabinet door turned sign HERE.)

Use chalk paint for a quick furniture makeover without the prep work of sanding!

Use chalk paint for a quick furniture makeover without the prep work of sanding!

Use chalk paint for a quick furniture makeover without the prep work of sanding!

Use chalk paint for a quick furniture makeover without the prep work of sanding!

Now I just need to find a new runner to complement my new table.  Anyone have any suggestions on great places to find one?

Cabinet Door Makeover

Easily transform a cabinet door into a customized sign for your home

A few months ago while I was browsing around a store, I found this awesome serving plate that had all the colors that I wanted to decorate my kitchen in.  The design was fun, the colors were bright and I think it cost me about $6.  Done and done.  Since buying that plate and putting it above my kitchen cabinets, I’ve slowly started filling in the space.  However, I’ve run into a few snags because of the way our ceiling slopes above the cabinets so the height varies a lot.

When we were building our house about 5 1/2 years ago, we chose a few upgrades at the time, such as marble counter tops in the kitchen, better carpet and padding, 2-panel doors and a bigger garage, just to name a few.  Looking back, one thing I wish we’d upgraded to were the staggered cabinets.  You know, the kind that  have varying heights instead of being the same all the way across.  It’s totally an aesthetic thing and doesn’t give any advantages besides maybe a little more space between the counter and the bottom of the cabinets.  But after trying to decorate above my cabinets for the last 5 years since we moved in, it’s something I’d really like to do in the next house we move into.

One day a couple of weeks ago, we were at a discount home store called ReStore which is run by the Habitat for Humanity.  They have a huge warehouse full of anything you might need for your home in terms of fixing it up.  We were actually there to buy paint for our garage (one of the many home projects we’ve been working on this summer) and I wandered over to the cabinet door section.  I’ve been searching for the right size of door so I could turn it into a sign to put above the cabinets and that day I was lucky!  I found the perfect shape and size for a whopping $4.  I couldn’t wait to get started.

Easily transform a cabinet door into a customized sign for your home

This last weekend while my husband was organizing all his tools and whatnot in the garage (with the help of our 4 year old who loves to sort) and my son was napping, I knew it was the perfect time to pull it out.  The only thing I knew for sure was that I wanted to use the word “gather”.  I thought it was a fitting word since that is usually what happens in the kitchen.

To paint the cabinet door, I used some sample paint we got when we were trying to decide what color to paint our basement.  We didn’t end up using the same color as the sample, but it was a good color for the sign.  It is good quality Behr paint with the primer and paint in one.  I didn’t worry about sanding it down at all, but I did give it a good wipe down before starting.  I used two coats of paint, getting it as even as possible.  (If you use a different type of paint, such as acrylic or chalk/milk paint, the number of coats you need may vary.)

Easily transform a cabinet door into a customized sign for your home

While the paint was drying, I pulled up my Silhouette software and started working on a design for the sign.  The cabinet door itself measures 23″ x 8 3/4″, but the space in the middle where I wanted to put the words and only measures 17 1/4″ x 2 3/4″.  I typed the word “gather” and then went through the different fonts until I found some I liked.  Then I compared them to each other and finally decided on the font Magnolia Sky which you can get for free HERE (the same font I used for my mama bear shirt).  I stretched the word out to fit the space but made sure it was still readable.

After looking at the word for a couple of minutes, I realized something was missing, so I opened my Silhouette library and grabbed some cute arrows to put on either side of “gather”.  It was the perfect touch!  For the vinyl, I used some from the pack I bought when I made my Summer Pallet Art and Mod Podge Notebook.  I’ve loved having such a great variety of colors to choose from when I need to add a little bit of vinyl to a project.  (You can buy some HERE.)

Easily transform a cabinet door into a customized sign for your home

I organized my design in my software so that I could cut all three colors of vinyl and my shapes at the same time by using the grid feature, then cutting my vinyl down to size and spacing it out on the cutting mat.  Then I loaded it up and let the Silhouette do it’s thing.

Easily transform a cabinet door into a customized sign for your home

Before I transferred the vinyl to the cabinet door, I used some transfer paper to make lining it up easier.  I also moved two of the yellow arrows to be in the middle of each set of grey arrows and cut out some transfer paper for those.  I measured the middle of the sign and the middle of the word “gather” and lined them up before pressing the vinyl to the sign.  I just kind of eyeballed the arrows before pressing the vinyl down.

Easily transform a cabinet door into a customized sign for your home

*Note: One great thing about transfer paper is that you can usually use it a few times before it’s not sticky anymore.  Just save the backing and put the paper back on it after you’re done.  This saves money and who doesn’t want that? *wink*

I found a small easel to set the sign up on and placed it above the cabinets.

Easily transform a cabinet door into a customized sign for your home

Easily transform a cabinet door into a customized sign for your home

I totally love how it turned out!  The size was perfect for the space and the colors coordinated well with the plate I used as my color inspiration.  (You can see the plate in the second picture below.)  Now I just need to decorate the rest of the space. *sigh*  One thing at a time I guess…

Easily transform a cabinet door into a customized sign for your home

Easily transform a cabinet door into a customized sign for your home

What do you have above your cabinets?  Please share so I can get some ideas!

Also, remember to hop over to the guest post for Bellissimo Bebe and enter the giveaway!  (Ends Sept 6, 2016 at 12AM.)

This post may contain affiliate links which if you click on them and make a purchase I will receive a small commission at no additional cost to you.

How To Stain Wood

A simple, step-by-step tutorial on how to stain wood

About a month or so ago I was wandering around one of my favorite home decor stores (The Wood Connection) and I saw a cute shadow box with the patriotic decor that had been stained.  The result was a more antique look to the wood since you could see the grain.  Now, up to this point, I’d never stained anything.  Paint is my go-to and wood stain was totally foreign to me.  I decided it was time to add it to my skill set and took it up to the front to pay for it, along with the shadow box.  I talked to the ladies up front and got a couple of tips and went on my way.

As I pulled out my supplies I went through a mental checklist of the things I needed:

  • sandpaper
  • wood stain
  • paintbrush
  • old t-shirt or rag
A simple, step-by-step tutorial on how to stain wood

The first step is to prep your wood by sanding it.  The instructions on the can of stain say to use fine-grade sandpaper (#220), but I only had #150 so I used that.  The wood was already pretty smooth with the exception of one edge.  Then I used a baby wipe to wipe off the excess wood dust.

Next, I popped open the can of stain.  (I used Minwax Wood Finish Penetrating Stain in Provincial 211.)  I dipped my paintbrush in the stain and applied it to the shadow box in the direction of the wood grain, trying to get an even coat.

A simple, step-by-step tutorial on how to stain wood

After I finished applying the stain, I let it sit for about 10-15 minutes.  Then I took an old t-shirt and started wiping the excess stain off.  Then I let it dry outside for an hour or so.  (It was too stinky to keep inside.)

A simple, step-by-step tutorial on how to stain wood

When I brought it in, I finished it off with some scrapbook paper on the bottom and a wood cutout of the United States that I had mod podged while the stain was drying.

A simple, step-by-step tutorial on how to stain wood

A simple, step-by-step tutorial on how to stain wood
See that grain?  So pretty!

Now that I’ve stained wood, I don’t know what was keeping me from doing it in the first place!  It was so easy and the result is exactly what I was looking for.  (If you’re nervous about it, just start with something simple like a shadow box or a wood block.)

Do you have any tips for staining wood?